Week Thirty-eight: Bridget Scoville

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When was the last time you were nervous?

As a part of your nervous system, nerves carry signals throughout your body. Nerves carry signals to and from the brain. When those nerves are damaged, they tell you that you are experiencing pain, numbness, and weakness. The feeling of nervousness can cause similar symptoms – pain, numbness, weakness. Overcoming those paralyzing feelings makes you stronger and more powerful.

I have been nervous about change for a little over a week now. Don’t get me wrong: I love change. I love experiencing new things. I have moved across the country twice, but this time is different. This time the change seems so much bigger deal. It’s scarier. Previously, my post-graduate training has led to positions with an end date. You’ll be here for 1-2 years, but this time is different.

Wherever I end up next has no specified ending. If things go well, I could hypothetically be at the same place for 6 years or more. It’s unknown. That makes me nervous. I am nervous about finding a new place to live. I am nervous about starting somewhere new. I am nervous about being the newbie again. I am nervous for the change and for the unknown, but I am also excited for the exact same reasons I am nervous. It’s exciting to start somewhere new, to make changes, to meet new people, and to explore new cities.

I remind myself that nervousness is normal. Everyone is nervous about change. I remind myself that with change comes opportunity, and with opportunity comes growth. I want to seize every opportunity to grow and to change. I have to remind myself to channel that energy into something positive.

This quote by Robert Gilbert sums up how I plan on channeling my nervousness over the next few months. “It’s all right to have butterflies in your stomach. Just get them to fly in formation.”

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Bridget Scoville is a pharmacist with a scholarly interest in the kidneys. She is completing a post-graduate research fellowship at the University of Michigan Ann Arbor. When she’s not working on research, Bridget can be found running, swapping stories over coffee, laughing with friends during dinner, or youth mentoring through Big Brothers Big Sisters.

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